Office 0333 123 0245,
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About the questions

The Driving test is changing on 4 December 2017. The questions you can be asked, and how you’ll be asked them will change.

The examiner will ask you one:

Tell me’ question (where you explain how you’d carry out a safety task) at the start of your test, before you start driving

Show me’ question (where you show how you’d carry out a safety task) while you’re driving

Show me, questions

  1. When it’s safe to do so, can you show me how you wash and clean the rear windscreen?
  2. When it’s safe to do so, can you show me how you wash and clean the front windscreen?
  3. When it’s safe to do so, can you show me how you’d switch on your dipped headlights?
  4. When it’s safe to do so, can you show me how you’d set the rear demister?
  5. When it’s safe to do so, can you show me how you’d operate the horn?
  6. When it’s safe to do so, can you show me how you’d demist the front windscreen?
  7. When it’s safe to do so, can you show me how you’d open and close the side window?

Tell me, questions

1. Tell me how you’d check that the brakes are working before starting a journey.

Brakes should not feel spongy or slack. Brakes should be tested as you set off. Vehicle should not pull to one side.

Manufacturer’s guide, use a reliable pressure gauge, check and adjust pressures when tyres are cold, don’t forget spare tyre, remember to refit valve caps.

3. Tell me how you make sure your head restraint is correctly adjusted so it provides the best protection in the event of a crash.

The head restraint should be adjusted so the rigid part of the head restraint is at least as high as the eye or top of the ears, and as close to the back of the head as is comfortable. Note: Some restraints might not be adjustable.

4. Tell me how you’d check the tyres to ensure that they have sufficient tread depth and that their general condition is safe to use on the road.

No cuts and bulges, 1.6mm of tread depth across the central three-quarters of the breadth of the tyre, and around the entire outer circumference.

5. Tell me how you’d check that the headlights and tail lights are working. You don’t need to exit the vehicle.

Explain you’d operate the switch (turn on ignition if necessary), then walk round vehicle (as this is a ‘tell me’ question, you don’t need to physically check the lights).

6. Tell me how you’d know if there was a problem with your anti-lock braking system.

Warning light should illuminate if there is a fault with the anti-lock braking system.

7. Tell me how you’d check the direction indicators are working. You don’t need to exit the vehicle.

Explain you’d operate the switch (turn on ignition if necessary), and then walk round vehicle (as this is a ‘tell me’ question, you don’t need to physically check the lights).

8. Tell me how you’d check the brake lights are working on this car.

Explain you’d operate the brake pedal, make use of reflections in windows or doors, or ask someone to help.

9. Tell me how you’d check the power-assisted steering is working before starting a journey.

If the steering becomes heavy, the system may not be working properly. Before starting a journey, 2 simple checks can be made.

Gentle pressure on the steering wheel, maintained while the engine is started, should result in a slight but noticeable movement as the system begins to operate. Alternatively turning the steering wheel just after moving off will give an immediate indication that the power assistance is functioning.

10. Tell me how you’d switch on the rear fog light(s) and explain when you’d use it/them. You don’t need to exit the vehicle.

Operate switch (turn on dipped headlights and ignition if necessary). Check warning light is on. Explain use.

11. Tell me how you switch your headlight from dipped to main beam and explain how you’d know the main beam is on.

Operate switch (with ignition or engine on if necessary), check with main beam warning light.

12. Tell me how you’d check that the engine has sufficient oil.

Identify dipstick/oil level indicator, describe check of oil level against the minimum and maximum markers.

13. Tell me how you’d check that the engine has sufficient engine coolant.

Identify high and low level markings on header tank where fitted or radiator filler cap, and describe how to top up to correct level.

14. Tell me how you’d check that you have a safe level of hydraulic brake fluid.

Identify reservoir, check level against high and low markings.

www.thedrivingskool.com

These tips should help make passing your driving test easier.

1. Practice. A lot

The Driving and Vehicle Standards Agency suggests that learners, on average, need about 45 hours of professional training plus 22 hours of private practice. Make sure you learn with an instructor you feel comfortable with, from a reputable driving school – and practise with an experienced friend or relative to hone your skills.

2. Warm up

Book a lesson near the test centre just before your test appointment time, so you don’t drive ‘cold’ when you have to get into the car with the examiner. It can also helps to scope out any obstructions such as potholes, local congestion or new roadworks, so you’re prepared if you encounter them during the test.

3. Relax

It’s perfectly normal to be nervous about taking your driving test, so take the pressure off yourself by not telling many people beforehand.

On the day, take deep breaths, count to 10 and exhale just before entering the test centre. Do this a few times and you should find yourself calming down and ready to drive.

4. Think positively

Before you enter the test centre, believe that you’re going to pass. Try some creative visualisation, which involves closing your eyes and imagining yourself driving well over the route, making flawless manoeuvres and seeing all the potential hazards.

5. Be comfortable in your car

Make sure you sit your test in a car you’ve driven regularly – either your instructor’s or the car you use for practising.

You need to feel completely comfortable with controls and, even more importantly, the biting point of the clutch, which will allow you to move off and change gears smoothly.

6. Know the route

Do your homework and make sure you know the area around the test centre and all the possible routes you’ll be driving. Drive them as often as possible with your instructor and, if possible, when practising privately.

It’s also important to be comfortable driving different on as many different types of road as possible, so you’re ready for the independent driving section of the test and, more importantly, life after passing your test.

7. Avoid the usual mistakes

Common driving test pitfalls include not checking mirrors sufficiently, inadequate observation when reverse parking or moving away, poor positioning at junctions and roundabouts, and inappropriate speed.

Discover these bad habits when you learn to drive to help you avoid them.

8. Be ready for anything

When learning, try to drive at different times of day, in sunny weather and the wet – and, if possible, in slippery or icy conditions so you’re prepared for any eventuality during your test.

9. Don’t be afraid to ask

If, at any time during the test, you don’t understand what the examiner has asked you to do, don’t be afraid to ask him or her to repeat the instruction.

10. Keep your eyes on the road

Whatever you do, don’t look at the examiner during the test or try to look at their notes and work out how well you’re doing.

Keep your eyes on the road, making full use of your mirrors and concentrate on what’s going on around you.

www.thedrivingskool.com

Office 0333 123 0245

Mobile 07919 193299

Driving Lessons Petts Wood

Browsing for driving lessons in Petts Wood or maybe thinking about doing an intensive driving course in Petts Wood?

Driving Lessons in Petts Wood should be a fun and enjoyable experience. You should feel like you are making progress during every lesson, and not be afraid to ask questions or seek clarification. Our aim is to ensure you always feel comfortable with your instructor.

Learning to drive is a life skill and if you choose to learn with the driving skool.com Petts Wood you will always receive an excellent standard of tuition and be well equipped with all the knowledge you will require beyond the day of your test.

We pride ourselves on our professional driving tuition which is reflected in our pass rates. Your driving lessons in Petts Wood can be in the evening, weekends or any time to suit you. Our door to door service allows you to fit your driving lessons around you and your commitments to make your driving as an enjoyable experience as possible.

Our competitive rates and block booking discounts will ensure that you get excellent value for money throughout your course of driving lessons in Petts Wood.

Not the Cheapest but the Best!

Chsilehurst

 

www.thedrivingskool.com

Office 0333 123 0245

Text/Call 07919 193299

This is the top 10 easiest mistakes to make in your test and how to avoid them.

Make sure you give yourself the best chance of passing your test, read this list and then learn from other peoples mistakes. When your instructor and you agree you are ready to sit the test, don’t let nerves get the better of you and remember not to make any of these mistakes

1.Observation at junctions – not remembering all your mirror checks and blind spots, or making the wrong decision based on what you see. Plan ahead, as you approach the end of the road check if it is an open or closed junction (look for walls, fences and hedges). Check right, check left then check right again making sure you look out for any hazards

2. Reverse Parking – ineffective observation or a lack of accuracy. Always check your blind spots looking out for approaching traffic. While reverse parking ask yourself, “Am I fully aware of everything that is going on around me?” At each stage of the manoeuvre ask yourself this again and check your mirrors/blind spots. Cyclists and pedestrians can’t be expected to hear or see you while you park.

3. Use of mirrors – not checking or not acting on the information. Have you checked your mirrors in the last 7 seconds? What did you see? Plan ahead but always remember to check your mirrors even if you think you know there is nothing there. If as a result of your driving you cause others to swerve, slow or stop its a serious fault.

4 Reversing Round a Corner – candidates often swing the vehicle out at the front, fail to spot approaching traffic in the road they are reversing into or hit the kerb. Do this manoeuvre slowly.

5. Incorrect use of Signals – giving the wrong signal or forgetting to cancel a signal. Remember to stop signalling once you have pulled over!

6. Driving away Safely – inadequate observation. ALWAYS check your road side blind spot when you drive away safely.

7. Incorrect Positioning on the Road – lane positioning at roundabouts, switching through lanes on the roundabout – steer the car with the curve, stay within the white lines.

8. Lack of Steering Control – Always maintain control of the speed and steering and never underestimate the sharpness of a corner. Follow best practice with hand position to reduce the chance of this fault.

9. Incorrect Position for turning right – at junctions or one-way streets. One one way streets ask yourself ‘which lane do I want to be in?’

10. Inappropriate Speed – NEVER break the speed limit. Don’t hesitate. Try to maintain speed with the traffic on the road at all times. Don’t think if you drive slowly you will pass. Its dangerous and you will fail.

These tips will help you avoid the common mistakes most people make when they fail. Make sure you maintain concentration at all times and remember to stay calm.

Ellyse

Pass with the driving skool.com