Office 0333 123 0245,
Text/Call 07919 193299

Learner drivers will be allowed to take motorway driving lessons with an approved driving instructor in a car with dual controls from 2018.

Allowing learner drivers to have lessons on motorways will help to make sure more drivers know how to use motorways safely.

At the moment, you can only have driving lessons on motorways after you’ve passed your driving test. Some newly-qualified drivers take lessons through the voluntary Pass Plus scheme.

How the change will work

The change will apply to England, Scotland and Wales. Learner drivers will need to be

Accompanied by an approved Driving Instructor

Driving a vehicle fitted with dual controls

Any motorways lessons will be voluntary. It will be up to the driving instructor to decide when the learner driver is competent enough to have a motorway lesson.Trainee driving instructors won’t be allowed to take learner drivers on the motorway.

Motorway driving will not be included in the driving test changes coming into force on 4 December 2017.

The change will only apply to learner drivers of cars – learner motorcyclists won’t be allowed to have motorway lessons.

When the change will happen

The exact date in 2018 will be confirmed nearer the time.

The change will be well-publicised so driving instructors and learner drivers are prepared for the change, and other road users know what to expect. The Highway Code rules on motorways will also be updated.

Driving instructor vehicles and training

Driving instructors will be allowed to decide whether or not to keep their driving school roof-top box on during motorway lessons, based on the manufacturer’s instructions.

However, the car will still need to display L plates on the front and rear if the rooftop box is removed.

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Our tips for tackling driving test nerves will make sure you keep your cool on the day.

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Your instructor will often recommend a mock test before the real thing. Make sure you’ve attempted at least one of these – preferably several – and that you can pass them before you even apply for the real thing.The night before your test, make sure you have all the documents you need for your test ready. These include your driving licence, theory test certificate and confirmation email/letter of the appointment.

Familiarise yourself with the test centre

It’s a good idea to visit the driving test centre before the test itself, especially if you haven’t already been there during your lessons. This will help you get used to the location and understand what goes on inside the centre. It’s best to get there early on the day, as rushing will just add to your nerves.

Eat and drink well

Have a banana for breakfast. Bananas are well known among instructors as the driving test superfood, as they’re full of B vitamins and contain tryptophan – a type of protein that the body converts into serotonin, the ‘happy hormone’ – which will help calm your nerves keep your mood upbeat.Nerves can reduce your appetite but it’s important to at least eat something so you have enough energy for the day and can concentrate. Don’t drink energy drinks or too much coffee before a test, as caffeine can heighten your nerves.

The waiting game

Sitting in the waiting room before your test is often the time when people feel the most anxious so it’s a good idea to bring a distraction such as a book or a game on your phone.Breathing exercises are an effective calming technique so focus as you inhale and exhale – this will have a soothing effect and stop your heart from racing. Laughing is also a great remedy for nerves and helps to boost your mood, so why not watch or read something that really makes you giggle? Remember that this is the worst bit – most people find their nerves ease once they’re on the road.

In the car

The examiner is human and they’re not there to fail you – they want you to pass – so don’t be afraid to talk to them as it may put you at ease. There’s nothing wrong with asking the examiner a question or to repeat an instruction if you didn’t hear it, either.Open the window to let in some fresh air if you’re feeling hot and flustered – this can also help to keep you alert. Watch your speed too – when people sometimes speed up when they’re nervous, so just imagine you’re on a normal lesson, breathe and focus.

www.thedrivingskool.com

 

At the driving skool.com, our Driving Instructors are extremely passionate about making your learning experience fun & exciting, teaching one-to-one driving skills in our dual control vehicles.We offer flexible lesson plans and a programme developed to fit around your lifestyle in a relaxed and enjoyable atmosphere teaching you safe driving for life

West Wickham Driving Test Centre

56 Glebe Way
West Wickham
Kent
BR4 0RL

Telephone:  0300 200 1122

Driving Test Centre.

No candidate parking but there is plenty of parking space in Rose Walk, the road next to West Wickham

Unisex Toilets available.  (When working!)

The West Wickham Driving Test Centre has reasonably good test centre pass rates compared to some other test centres located in or near London

The driving test routes are still challenging and will feature fast paced traffic with difficult road systems.

The Examiner will ask you two of the show me, tell me Questions

You will be asked to do either, the turn in the road, Parallel park or the Left reverse. They will not test for the bay park as they do not have the facilities to complete this exercise.  There is approx a 1 in 3 chance you may also be asked to do the Emergency stop

These areas can often be narrow roads with parked cars so are used to assess passing distances and meeting oncoming vehicles.

The duration of the driving test from West Wickham Driving Test Centre is to take around 30 – 40 minutes. Approximately 10 minutes of this time is reserved for independent driving. Expect many challenging roundabouts from multi lane to mini. Challenging junctions often being closed or busy and crossroads.

West_Wickham_stn_signage

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e-mail: info@thedrivingskool.com
Office: 0333 123 0245
Mobile: 07919 193299

How many driving lessons on average do you need to take before you can pass? What’s the average number of lessons people take before they take their driving test?

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Chances are, these are questions you’ve been asking yourself and others.

We’re here to tell you the answer is ‘does not matter’.

That’s right. It does not matter what the average number of lessons is, because you are not an average person. You are unique with unique skills and unique needs.

You probably have noticed when asking around for the number of average lessons you’ll get all sorts of ridiculous numbers. We’ve even heard people claiming they only needed 10 lessons to pass their driving test!

Let’s pretend for a second that they’re telling the truth (they’re not). They passed after 10 lessons (they didn’t). So what?

What has somebody else’s ability (or imagination) got to do with you?

Even still, we have a problem with the question. In fact, any decent driving instructor should whince if you ask them how many lessons you need before you can pass your test.

The reason is simple. Do you want to simply pass your test, or do you want to be a safe and confident driver?

Every year hundreds of new drivers die on the road. Imagine how much smaller the figure would be if all of those drivers had the desire to become safe drivers, rather than to just scrape a pass for their driving test with the minimum amount of lessons?

Think about it for a second. Do you want to sacrifice your life (and other people’s) for the sake of shaving off a few hours and saving £100?

There is a myth out there that driving instructors want to stretch out the number of lessons as much as possible. That if they could they’d make you have to take 100 lessons before you could take your test.

This is just untrue.

Every driving instructor has a responsibility to you. They would rather be accused of stretching out lessons than be the one who rushed through 20 lessons for a young person to pass their test only to die in a car crash months later.

That is why we’re not going to tell you what the average number of lessons it takes to pass. We don’t want to add to the idea that the point of driving lessons is to learn the bare minimum in the minimal amount of time to squeeze through a pass.

It will take you as long as it will and as many lessons as it will to be a safe and confident driver.

Remember, your safety is worth far more than any amount of money you think you’ll be saving by rushing things.

www.thedrivingskool.com

Office 0333 123 0245

Mobile 07919 193299

Learner drivers may be asked to use satnav and three-point turn could be scrapped in favour of more common manoeuvres

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The three-point turn could be dropped from driving tests after the government signalled the biggest shakeup in 20 years.

Learners may be asked to use a satellite navigation system as part of a revised practical exam and the three-point-turn – more recently known as the “turn in the road” – could be scrapped altogether.

About 1,000 learner drivers across the UK will be invited to a trial of new practical exam measures designed to “better reflect real-life driving”.

The test has existed in its current form for about two decades, although “independent driving” – where motorists are asked to find their way to a destination – has formed part of the practical exam in recent years.

A Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) spokesman said: “We are carrying out initial research to explore how the driving test could better reflect real-life driving. Any future changes to the test would be subject to full public consultation.”

The trial will consider extending the independent driving section from 10 to 20 minutes of the total 40-minute length, and asking candidates to follow directions on a satnav, as an alternative to using road signs.

It will also consider replacing the “reverse around a corner” and “turn in the road” manoeuvres with more realistic everyday moves, such as reversing out of a parking bay, or pulling up on the left or right before rejoining the flow of traffic, the DVSA said.

Learners may also be asked one of the two safety questions while on the move rather than at the start of the test. This could involve operating the rear windscreen heater while driving.

The Driving Instructors Association (DIA), the largest industry body for driver and rider trainers, has welcomed plans to review the driving test.

Carly Brookfield, DIA chief executive, said: “DIA has been heavily involved in the scoping of this project and is enthusiastic about the opportunity it presents to evolve the L-test to a level where it more realistically assesses a candidate’s ability to competently and safely manage road based risk and driving in real life, on real roads.

“The DIA and its members will play a key role in the project as it is critical customers of the test, such as driving instructors and candidates, have their input in making the test more fit for purpose and more reflective of modern driving.”

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Learners in the capital face toughest challenge

THOSE brave enough to learn to drive in London take longer to pass their tests. (Jay like many of our customers rose to the challenge!)

A new study by Privilege Car Insurance shows that learners in Belvedere, South London have a pass-rate of just 31%. Shedding L-plates isn’t much easier north of the Thames either, with just 32% passing in Wanstead, North East London.

That’s compared to the 70% of new drivers who pass learning on the roads in Kelso, Scotland and 69% in Lochgilphead, Scotland.

Charlotte Fielding from the car insurance firm said: “The general rule is that if you are driving on busier roads and complex road systems, your driving test is likely to be tougher.”

HIGHEST PASS RATES

70% – Kelso, Scotland
69% – Lochgilphead, Scotland
67% – Stranraer, Scotland
67% – Kendal, Cumbria
66% – Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria

LOWEST PASS RATES

31% – Belvedere, SE London
32% – Wanstead, NE London
32% – Barking, E London
33% – Wood Green, N London
35% – Stevenage, Hertfordshire

Pass your practical in London with the driving skool.com

Goodmayes Driving Test Centre

Test centre address

98 Goodmayes Road
Ilford
Greater London
IG3 9UZ

Contact details:  0300 200 1122.

Test centre details

Waiting room is on the 1st floor, there are two flights of stairs. Candidates with mobility impairment will be met in the DTC car park.
Toilets to first floor.

Situated on the busy city roads of London, Goodmayes Driving Test Centre test routes will involve many complicated roundabouts, junctions and crossroads. A high level of practice and knowledge of such roads in and around the test centre is beneficial.
Narrow residential roads are often featured as part of the driving test. These roads involve narrow lanes, sharp bends and oncoming traffic.
Busy A roads such as the A1083 and A118 are highly likely as are dual carriageways such as the A406, A12 and A13 with a slight possibility of more rural roads that are within test centre radius.

The driving test examiner will require at least 1 driving test manoeuvre with a 1 in 3 possibility of incorporating the emergency stop procedure. Goodmayes Driving Test Centre has a small car park that is frequently used for the bay parking manoeuvre.

The car park at Goodmayes is small, try not to arrive for the driving test more than 10 minutes before the test booking time as this may conflict with other learner drivers returning from their test.

The driving test from Goodmayes Driving Test Centre is challenging due to difficult roads and roundabouts. As Goodmayes is located in a busy area, more emphasis is placed on busy urban roads and very little on country roads and driving.

A good understanding of the driving test routes from Goodmayes Driving Test Centre will benefit you with knowledge of the types of road you will be taking during the driving test.

For more local knowledge, with local female & male Driving Instructors contact

the driving skool.com

Book a driving test at Goodmayes driving test centre

Driving tests cannot be booked through the test centres directly. To book a driving test, there are 2 options; by phone or online.

Book a driving test by phone

To book a practical driving test at the Goodmayes Driving Test Centre by phone, call the DSA on 0300 200 1122. This driving test booking telephone number is an automated system. A DSA representative can be reached however by listening to the options.

Book your driving test online:

To book your driving test online for Goodmayes Driving Test Centre, click here

Making changes to the driving test at Goodmayes

Cancelling and rescheduling the driving test at Goodmayes can be done provided at least 3 working days notice if given. The DSA will be unable to offer a refund or reschedule the test if this notice is not met.

For information on learning to drive with a Local Driving Instructor, with Local Knowledge

www.thedrivingskool.com

info@thedrivingskool.com
Office: 0333 123 0245
Mobile: 07919 193299

 

goodmayes

Hither Green Test Centre

42-44 Ennersdale Road
Hither Green
London
SE13 6JD

Contact: 0300 200 1122

Hither Green Driving Test Centre information

Hither Green Driving Test Centre is situated around very busy urban roads where the test examiner will require a high degree of knowledge of various road systems.

Excellent ability and safety of roundabouts, junctions and crossroads is essential. Quiet residential roads are often incorporated into the driving test. These roads present hazardous conditions due to being narrow with speed restrictions (Usually 20mph)

Ability to manoeuvre the car for oncoming traffic is important. Faster paced roads such as the A20 and A205 being likely.

1 of the 4 test manoeuvres will be requested and the emergency stop procedure has a 1 in 3 possibility. The independent part of the test reserves 10 minutes of test time.

Book a driving test at Hither Green driving test centre

Driving tests cannot be booked through the test centres directly. To book a driving test, there are 2 options; by phone or online.

Book a driving test by phone

To book a practical driving test at the Hither Green driving test centre by telephone, call the DSA on 0300 200 1122.

Book your driving test online

To book your driving test online for Hither Green Driving Test Centre, click here.

Test cancellations and rescheduling

Rescheduling or cancelling the test from Hither Green can be done via the above contact methods. If by telephone, talk to a DSA assistant regarding this matter. A minimum of 3 working days notice is necessary if you with to reschedule to a later date or to receive a full refund if cancelling.

For more local knowledge, with local female & male Driving Instructors contact:

www.the driving skool.com

info@thedrivingskool.com
Office: 0333 123 0245
Mobile: 07919 193299

hither

This is the top 10 easiest mistakes to make in your test and how to avoid them.

Make sure you give yourself the best chance of passing your test, read this list and then learn from other peoples mistakes. When your instructor and you agree you are ready to sit the test, don’t let nerves get the better of you and remember not to make any of these mistakes

1.Observation at junctions – not remembering all your mirror checks and blind spots, or making the wrong decision based on what you see. Plan ahead, as you approach the end of the road check if it is an open or closed junction (look for walls, fences and hedges). Check right, check left then check right again making sure you look out for any hazards

2. Reverse Parking – ineffective observation or a lack of accuracy. Always check your blind spots looking out for approaching traffic. While reverse parking ask yourself, “Am I fully aware of everything that is going on around me?” At each stage of the manoeuvre ask yourself this again and check your mirrors/blind spots. Cyclists and pedestrians can’t be expected to hear or see you while you park.

3. Use of mirrors – not checking or not acting on the information. Have you checked your mirrors in the last 7 seconds? What did you see? Plan ahead but always remember to check your mirrors even if you think you know there is nothing there. If as a result of your driving you cause others to swerve, slow or stop its a serious fault.

4 Reversing Round a Corner – candidates often swing the vehicle out at the front, fail to spot approaching traffic in the road they are reversing into or hit the kerb. Do this manoeuvre slowly.

5. Incorrect use of Signals – giving the wrong signal or forgetting to cancel a signal. Remember to stop signalling once you have pulled over!

6. Driving away Safely – inadequate observation. ALWAYS check your road side blind spot when you drive away safely.

7. Incorrect Positioning on the Road – lane positioning at roundabouts, switching through lanes on the roundabout – steer the car with the curve, stay within the white lines.

8. Lack of Steering Control – Always maintain control of the speed and steering and never underestimate the sharpness of a corner. Follow best practice with hand position to reduce the chance of this fault.

9. Incorrect Position for turning right – at junctions or one-way streets. One one way streets ask yourself ‘which lane do I want to be in?’

10. Inappropriate Speed – NEVER break the speed limit. Don’t hesitate. Try to maintain speed with the traffic on the road at all times. Don’t think if you drive slowly you will pass. Its dangerous and you will fail.

These tips will help you avoid the common mistakes most people make when they fail. Make sure you maintain concentration at all times and remember to stay calm.

Ellyse

Pass with the driving skool.com