Office 0333 123 0245,
Text/Call 07599 408188

Bromley Driving Test Centre

Burnt Ash Lane

121-123 Burnt Ash Lane
BROMLEY
Kent
BR1 5AB

DVSA Test Centre

121-123 Burnt Ash Lane, Bromley, BR1 5AB

Parking: Due to the car park being in a residential area with limited parking Enter the car park via Brindley way and NOT through the alley way between the shops
Toilets: Male and female toilets available

To book your driving test: https://www.gov.uk/book-driving-test

Rear Parking Bays

Rear Parking Bays

 

www.thedrivingskool.com

Office 0333 123 0245

Mobile 07919 193299

 

 

 

 

 

When learning to drive you’re likely to learn all your driving skills with an instructor, and then perfect these if you take up private practice outside of your lessons. This is a great way to work on your driving skills, as well as building confidence to get you through your test. But what about after you’ve passed your test? Many young drivers want to jump in their car as a full licence holder and take to the road – but the places they want to go, they haven’t practised!

So we thought we’d pull together 8 places you can go as a learner driver during private practice, which should help give you confidence after you’ve passed!

1. Drive Thru

As any self-respecting new driver does, one of the first things I did when I got my car was head to my local McDonald’s Drive-Thru! Exciting about being behind the wheel (and obviously for the nuggets that were coming my way), I didn’t realise how tricky they are to actually navigate your way through! Tight corners, slow-moving cars, getting close enough to the window to actually pay and pick up your food – it’s a difficult thing to master. Making these trips as a learner during private practice means you’ll be a pro by the time you get your full licence.

2. Multi-storey

Whether you like them or loathe them – you’ll more than likely end up using a multi-storey car park at some point as a new driver. You’re probably used to hill starts and driving down slopes, but it’s a completely different ball game when you’re in a confined space surrounded by other cars! Even if you don’t need to go shopping, it’s worth heading to a multi-storey car park to practice your driving and parking. A little tip: when driving in a multi-storey, stick in first gear and avoid using the clutch. This will give you complete control over your speed when driving up and down the ramps.

3. Fill up with fuel

One of the things we rarely think about (let alone practice) is filling up a car with fuel – and if you’ve never done it before, it can be pretty tricky. Knowing which side your petrol cap is, parking the correct distance from the pump, and using those complicated ‘Pay at the Pump’ options can be a minefield if you’re not used to it! It’s worth heading out when it’s quiet and practising filling up fuel with your accompanying driver. That way, when it comes to filling up on your own, you’ll be fine!

It’s worth remembering that each car is different, so figure out how to open the fuel cap of the car you’re driving before heading off. Top tip: the image of the fuel pump on the dashboard often has an arrow next to it – this shows you what side of the car you fill up from!

4. Nighttime

Out of 500 learner drivers that we surveyed, 58%* of them said they wished nighttime driving to be incorporated into driving lessons – and it makes sense. Driving at night is much more challenging than you may first realise. There’s limited visibility overall, and pairing this with bright street lights and other car lights which can be quite dazzling, especially if you haven’t done it before.

5. Seaside

If you pass during the summer, one of the first trips you may want to take is heading to the seaside with your friends – right? Seaside drives can actually be pretty difficult! If it’s a nice day, you can almost guarantee everyone else plans on hitting the beach too, which means a lot of traffic! If you’re dealing with this as a new driver, as well as heading to a likely overcrowded car park – it’s going to be pretty stressful!

Think about heading to the seaside on a practice run before passing your test. You can figure out the route, and maybe even find a hidden gem car park that won’t be as busy when the sun comes out!

6. City Centre

You may have practised driving around your local city centre on your driving lessons, but going further afield and driving to different town or city can be daunting, especially if it’s new territory. You’ll have to deal with different road layouts, roundabouts and probably the same parking situation as if you were going to the beach. Maybe take some time during your private practice to visit a nearby town or city you’re unfamiliar with – this will help build your confidence for when you tackle it alone.

7. Event

Whether you’re a sports fan or music lover, you may be super-eager to head to a concert or festival with your new found freedom! The biggest challenges when driving to and from an event are getting in, parking and getting out. It may sound simple, but when thousands of people want to do it at the same time, it can definitely raise your stress levels – especially if you’re driving back from a gig late at night and you’re tired! If you’ve got an event coming up as a learner, consider offering to drive to or from the venue. You’ll get a taste for what it’s like, without being thrown completely in the deep end.

8. Village driving

Narrow and winding roads, paired with other cars and pedestrians can make driving through a small village pretty challenging. You will often find yourself faced with blind corners and tight bends which can make any new driver nervous. So to build up your confidence put on your L plates and get practising – dealing with as many different driving scenarios as a learner, when you have an experienced driver with you, will help to build up your skill and confidence for when you hit the roads on your own!

And there you have it – 8 different places we think you should try to drive to whilst you’ve still got the L plates on. Make the most of your time as a learner, and try to gain as much experience as you can! If you can think of any other drives learners should take, let us know!

Marmalade Driving Hub: www.wearemarmalade.co.uk/driver-hub

The Bromley Driving Test Centre will close on Friday 21 December 2018. (Bromley Court Hotel)

All driving tests from Thursday 3 January 2019 will be carried out at Club Langley, Bromley.

Driving test centre address

Club Langley driving test centre
2 Hawsbrook Lane
Beckenham
Kent
BR3 3SR

tesr

the driving skool.com Call 0333 123 0245

 

New drivers could face restrictions on the number of passengers they can carry, plus a mandatory six-month training period

New drivers could soon face new laws after the Department for Transport said it is to investigate introducing graduated driving licences

The proposals would limit the number of passengers new, young drivers could carry, set a minimum learning period of six months before a driving test could be taken and mandate the displaying of ‘P’ plates for the first two years after the passing of driving tests.

The news comes as a letter written by roads safety minister, Jesse Norman, says a proposed graduated driving licence system in Northern Ireland will be used as a “pilot” scheme to gauge whether graduated driving licences should be introduced across the UK.

In the letter, sent to Scottish SMP David Stewart, Norman writes: “The Department for Transport has decided to use the introduction of  graduated driving licences in Northern Ireland as a pilot to gather evidence on the potential for graduated driving licences in GB”.

Northern Irish authorities are currently in the second stage of a public consultation, which proposes limiting the number of passengers new drivers aged 24 and under can carry for the first six months after passing their driving tests.

Under the plans, young drivers would only be allowed to carry one passenger aged between 14 to 20, between the hours of 11pm and 6am, for the first six months after passing their test – though immediate family members would be exempt from this rule.

The graduated driving licence would also mandate a minimum learning period of six months before a driving test can be taken, while new drivers would also have to display ‘R’ plates (short for ‘restricted’) for two years after passing the test – though any UK graduated driving licence scheme outside of Northern Ireland would most likely use the more familiar ‘P’ plates.

Novice drivers in Northern Ireland already face post-test restrictions, which mandate the carrying of ‘R’ plates for the first year of driving, and set a maximum speed limit of 45mph – though the proposed graduated driving licence system would see an end to that limit.

 

the driving skool.com Chislehurst Kent

www.thedrivingskool.com Call 0333 123 0245

 

 

Learner drivers can take motorway driving lessons with an approved driving instructor from 4 June 2018.

From Monday 4 June 2018, learner drivers will be able to take driving lessons on motorways in England, Scotland and Wales.

This will help to make sure more drivers know how to use motorways safely.

At the moment, you can only have motorway lessons after you’ve passed your driving test. Some newly-qualified drivers take lessons through the voluntary Pass Plus scheme.

How the change will work

Learner drivers will need to be:

Accompanied by an approved driving instructor

Driving a car fitted with dual controls

Any motorways lessons will be voluntary.  It will be up to the driving instructor to decide when the learner driver is competent enough for them

The change only applies to learner drivers of cars. Learner motorcyclists won’t be allowed on motorways.

Trainee driving instructors won’t be allowed to take learner drivers on the motorway.

Motorway driving isn’t being introduced to the driving test as part of this change.

Until the law changes, it’s still illegal for a learner driver to drive on a motorway.

www.thedrivingskool.com Office: 0333 123 0245 Mobile: 07919 193299

The driving test will change from Monday 4 December 2017 to include following directions from a sat nav and testing different manoeuvres.

The changes are designed to make sure new drivers have the skills they’ll need to help them through a lifetime of safe driving.

The changes will only apply to car driving tests to begin with.

The 4 driving test changes

1. Independent driving part of the test will increase to 20 minutes

The independent driving part of the test currently lasts around 10 minutes. During this part of the test, you have to drive without turn-by-turn directions from the driving examiner.

This part of the test will be made longer, so it’ll last around 20 minutes – roughly half of the test.

2. Following directions from a sat nav

During the independent driving part of the test, most candidates will be asked to follow directions from a sat nav.

The examiner will provide the sat nav (a TomTom Start 52) and set it up. You won’t need to set the route – the examiner will do this for you. So, it doesn’t matter what make or model of sat nav you practise with.

You can’t follow directions from your own sat nav during the test – you have to use the one supplied by the examiner.

You’ll be able to ask the examiner for confirmation of where you’re going if you’re not sure. It won’t matter if you go the wrong way unless you make a fault while doing it.

One in 5 driving tests won’t use a sat nav. You’ll need to follow traffic signs instead.

3. Reversing manoeuvres will be changed

The ‘reverse around a corner’ and ‘turn-in-the-road’ manoeuvres will no longer be tested, but you should still be taught them by your instructor.

You’ll be asked to do one of 3 possible reversing manoeuvres:

Parallel park at the side of the road

Park in a bay – either driving in and reversing out, or reversing in and driving out (the examiner will tell you which you have to do)

Pull up on the right-hand side of the road, reverse for 2 car lengths and rejoin the traffic

4. Answering a vehicle safety question while you’re driving

The examiner will ask you 2 vehicle safety questions during your driving test – these are known as the ‘show me, tell me’ questions.

Tell me question (where you explain how you’d carry out a safety task) at the start of your test, before you start driving

Show m’ question (where you show how you’d carry out a safety task) while you’re driving – for example, showing how to wash the windscreen using the car controls and wipers

Pass mark, length of test and cost not changing

The pass mark is staying the same. So, you’ll pass your test if you make no more than 15 driving faults and no serious or dangerous faults.

The examiner will still mark the test in the same way, and the same things will still count as faults.

The overall time of the driving test won’t change. It will still take around 40 minutes. The driving test cost will also stay the same.

Learner drivers will be allowed to take motorway driving lessons with an approved driving instructor in a car with dual controls from 2018.

Allowing learner drivers to have lessons on motorways will help to make sure more drivers know how to use motorways safely.

At the moment, you can only have driving lessons on motorways after you’ve passed your driving test. Some newly-qualified drivers take lessons through the voluntary Pass Plus scheme.

How the change will work

The change will apply to England, Scotland and Wales. Learner drivers will need to be

Accompanied by an approved Driving Instructor

Driving a vehicle fitted with dual controls

Any motorways lessons will be voluntary. It will be up to the driving instructor to decide when the learner driver is competent enough to have a motorway lesson.Trainee driving instructors won’t be allowed to take learner drivers on the motorway.

Motorway driving will not be included in the driving test changes coming into force on 4 December 2017.

The change will only apply to learner drivers of cars – learner motorcyclists won’t be allowed to have motorway lessons.

When the change will happen

The exact date in 2018 will be confirmed nearer the time.

The change will be well-publicised so driving instructors and learner drivers are prepared for the change, and other road users know what to expect. The Highway Code rules on motorways will also be updated.

Driving instructor vehicles and training

Driving instructors will be allowed to decide whether or not to keep their driving school roof-top box on during motorway lessons, based on the manufacturer’s instructions.

However, the car will still need to display L plates on the front and rear if the rooftop box is removed.

www.thedrivingskool.com

As we move into summer, it’s worth talking about some of the road users that begin to appear when the weather improves. Motorcyclists are one of the most vulnerable groups to injury or fatality when involved in collisions.

When a crash happens involving a motorcycle and other vehicle, who is typically found at fault?

It’s most often the fault of the OTHER DRIVER…. SURPRISED?

In fact when it’s not a single vehicle incident involving the motorcycle, it’s usually the other driver who has made a mistake that resulted in the accident.

What is the most common place and type of collision involving a motorcycle and other vehicle?

There are certainly many places where vehicles can collide; but the most common place for another vehicle and a motorcycle to collide is at an intersection when the other driver is turning left or right and turns in front of the motorcyclist.

Why does this happen? (a driver turning in front of an oncoming motorcycle)

There are 2 primary reasons that this can happen:

  • The driver of the other vehicle simply did not see the motorcycle. Motorcycles are smaller and more difficult to see and many drivers don’t think to actually watch for them.
  • Speed: The driver of the other vehicle DOES see the motorcycle but thinks he has time to turn because he misjudges the approach speed

Tailgating Tips:

Motorbikes are vulnerable road users; they do not have the protection that a car or Lorry has. Almost, always result in injury.

If you expect to see motorbikes, you are more likely to detect them. Often we can filter out the things we don’t expect and just not see them Always look for motorbikes especially at intersections

Motorbikes are much more lighter than other vehicles and can stop in much shorter distances. This means that when you are following a motorbike, you should leave more distance. If the rider has to make an emergency stop, the bike will stop in  a much shorter distance than your vehicle.

When you see a motorcycle approaching, realize that it’s easy to misjudge the speed because the size of the cycle and the fact that its coming towards you makes it difficult to estimate speed.

  • Keep Your Eyes Up – It’s tempting to look down and over the bonnet of the car at the centre line or the tail lights in front of you, but this can cause several problems. When your eyes are looking downward over the bonnet, steering can become choppy and require many more adjustments, and frequently you will either cut corners or run wide. It’s much more effective to keep your eyes up and this practise prepares you for the next technique.
  • Eye Lead Time – Look 12 to 15 seconds ahead of where your vehicle is at any given time. As your speed increases, so will the distance you look ahead if you always look for this time interval.
  • Move Your Eyes – This takes practice and intent. Look right, left, ahead and into the mirrors and as you look, identify potential problems so that you can decide what you will do about them. Moving your eyes is particularly important to see things to the side because your peripheral vision becomes increasingly ineffective as your speed increases.
  • See the Big Picture – By moving your eyes, you get a ‘big picture’ perspective of the traffic environment and your place in it. Pilots call this ‘situational awareness’ and it helps you to make good decisions about speed and movement such as lane changes, well in advance.
  • Eye Contact – The only way to know if another driver sees you is to make eye contact with them. If they are looking at you and you see them making eye contact with you, you can be fairly sure (but not guaranteed) that they see you. If another driver is moving into your space and you want to establish eye contact, a light tap on the horn will attract their attention.

Practical Challenge:

For the next week, make a point of watching for motorcycles and develop a habit of identifying them as soon as you can. Be especially careful at junctions/intersections.

www.thedrivingskool.com

About the questions

The Driving test is changing on 4 December 2017. The questions you can be asked, and how you’ll be asked them will change.

The examiner will ask you one:

Tell me’ question (where you explain how you’d carry out a safety task) at the start of your test, before you start driving

Show me’ question (where you show how you’d carry out a safety task) while you’re driving

Show me, questions

  1. When it’s safe to do so, can you show me how you wash and clean the rear windscreen?
  2. When it’s safe to do so, can you show me how you wash and clean the front windscreen?
  3. When it’s safe to do so, can you show me how you’d switch on your dipped headlights?
  4. When it’s safe to do so, can you show me how you’d set the rear demister?
  5. When it’s safe to do so, can you show me how you’d operate the horn?
  6. When it’s safe to do so, can you show me how you’d demist the front windscreen?
  7. When it’s safe to do so, can you show me how you’d open and close the side window?

Tell me, questions

1. Tell me how you’d check that the brakes are working before starting a journey.

Brakes should not feel spongy or slack. Brakes should be tested as you set off. Vehicle should not pull to one side.

Manufacturer’s guide, use a reliable pressure gauge, check and adjust pressures when tyres are cold, don’t forget spare tyre, remember to refit valve caps.

3. Tell me how you make sure your head restraint is correctly adjusted so it provides the best protection in the event of a crash.

The head restraint should be adjusted so the rigid part of the head restraint is at least as high as the eye or top of the ears, and as close to the back of the head as is comfortable. Note: Some restraints might not be adjustable.

4. Tell me how you’d check the tyres to ensure that they have sufficient tread depth and that their general condition is safe to use on the road.

No cuts and bulges, 1.6mm of tread depth across the central three-quarters of the breadth of the tyre, and around the entire outer circumference.

5. Tell me how you’d check that the headlights and tail lights are working. You don’t need to exit the vehicle.

Explain you’d operate the switch (turn on ignition if necessary), then walk round vehicle (as this is a ‘tell me’ question, you don’t need to physically check the lights).

6. Tell me how you’d know if there was a problem with your anti-lock braking system.

Warning light should illuminate if there is a fault with the anti-lock braking system.

7. Tell me how you’d check the direction indicators are working. You don’t need to exit the vehicle.

Explain you’d operate the switch (turn on ignition if necessary), and then walk round vehicle (as this is a ‘tell me’ question, you don’t need to physically check the lights).

8. Tell me how you’d check the brake lights are working on this car.

Explain you’d operate the brake pedal, make use of reflections in windows or doors, or ask someone to help.

9. Tell me how you’d check the power-assisted steering is working before starting a journey.

If the steering becomes heavy, the system may not be working properly. Before starting a journey, 2 simple checks can be made.

Gentle pressure on the steering wheel, maintained while the engine is started, should result in a slight but noticeable movement as the system begins to operate. Alternatively turning the steering wheel just after moving off will give an immediate indication that the power assistance is functioning.

10. Tell me how you’d switch on the rear fog light(s) and explain when you’d use it/them. You don’t need to exit the vehicle.

Operate switch (turn on dipped headlights and ignition if necessary). Check warning light is on. Explain use.

11. Tell me how you switch your headlight from dipped to main beam and explain how you’d know the main beam is on.

Operate switch (with ignition or engine on if necessary), check with main beam warning light.

12. Tell me how you’d check that the engine has sufficient oil.

Identify dipstick/oil level indicator, describe check of oil level against the minimum and maximum markers.

13. Tell me how you’d check that the engine has sufficient engine coolant.

Identify high and low level markings on header tank where fitted or radiator filler cap, and describe how to top up to correct level.

14. Tell me how you’d check that you have a safe level of hydraulic brake fluid.

Identify reservoir, check level against high and low markings.

www.thedrivingskool.com

Reducing waiting times:

New Driving Test Centre

Lb_bromley.svg

 Practical Driving Test Centre

Bromley Court Hotel
Bromley Hill
Bromley
Kent
BR1 4JD

From 30th January 2017 candidates in London will have a greater choice of location to take their driving test.

The DVSA will be opening a new temporary driving test centre in Bromley Hill. Tests will be available to book from Janauary 16th 2017.

On arrival please park in bays marked DVSA and report to the dedicated waiting room

To book your Practical Driving test to

  https://www.gov.uk/book-driving-test

www,thedrivingskool.com