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As we move into summer, it’s worth talking about some of the road users that begin to appear when the weather improves. Motorcyclists are one of the most vulnerable groups to injury or fatality when involved in collisions.

When a crash happens involving a motorcycle and other vehicle, who is typically found at fault?

It’s most often the fault of the OTHER DRIVER…. SURPRISED?

In fact when it’s not a single vehicle incident involving the motorcycle, it’s usually the other driver who has made a mistake that resulted in the accident.

What is the most common place and type of collision involving a motorcycle and other vehicle?

There are certainly many places where vehicles can collide; but the most common place for another vehicle and a motorcycle to collide is at an intersection when the other driver is turning left or right and turns in front of the motorcyclist.

Why does this happen? (a driver turning in front of an oncoming motorcycle)

There are 2 primary reasons that this can happen:

  • The driver of the other vehicle simply did not see the motorcycle. Motorcycles are smaller and more difficult to see and many drivers don’t think to actually watch for them.
  • Speed: The driver of the other vehicle DOES see the motorcycle but thinks he has time to turn because he misjudges the approach speed

Tailgating Tips:

Motorbikes are vulnerable road users; they do not have the protection that a car or Lorry has. Almost, always result in injury.

If you expect to see motorbikes, you are more likely to detect them. Often we can filter out the things we don’t expect and just not see them Always look for motorbikes especially at intersections

Motorbikes are much more lighter than other vehicles and can stop in much shorter distances. This means that when you are following a motorbike, you should leave more distance. If the rider has to make an emergency stop, the bike will stop in  a much shorter distance than your vehicle.

When you see a motorcycle approaching, realize that it’s easy to misjudge the speed because the size of the cycle and the fact that its coming towards you makes it difficult to estimate speed.

  • Keep Your Eyes Up – It’s tempting to look down and over the bonnet of the car at the centre line or the tail lights in front of you, but this can cause several problems. When your eyes are looking downward over the bonnet, steering can become choppy and require many more adjustments, and frequently you will either cut corners or run wide. It’s much more effective to keep your eyes up and this practise prepares you for the next technique.
  • Eye Lead Time – Look 12 to 15 seconds ahead of where your vehicle is at any given time. As your speed increases, so will the distance you look ahead if you always look for this time interval.
  • Move Your Eyes – This takes practice and intent. Look right, left, ahead and into the mirrors and as you look, identify potential problems so that you can decide what you will do about them. Moving your eyes is particularly important to see things to the side because your peripheral vision becomes increasingly ineffective as your speed increases.
  • See the Big Picture – By moving your eyes, you get a ‘big picture’ perspective of the traffic environment and your place in it. Pilots call this ‘situational awareness’ and it helps you to make good decisions about speed and movement such as lane changes, well in advance.
  • Eye Contact – The only way to know if another driver sees you is to make eye contact with them. If they are looking at you and you see them making eye contact with you, you can be fairly sure (but not guaranteed) that they see you. If another driver is moving into your space and you want to establish eye contact, a light tap on the horn will attract their attention.

Practical Challenge:

For the next week, make a point of watching for motorcycles and develop a habit of identifying them as soon as you can. Be especially careful at junctions/intersections.

www.thedrivingskool.com

Reducing waiting times:

New Driving Test Centre

Lb_bromley.svg

 Practical Driving Test Centre

Bromley Court Hotel
Bromley Hill
Bromley
Kent
BR1 4JD

From 30th January 2017 candidates in London will have a greater choice of location to take their driving test.

The DVSA will be opening a new temporary driving test centre in Bromley Hill. Tests will be available to book from Janauary 16th 2017.

On arrival please park in bays marked DVSA and report to the dedicated waiting room

To book your Practical Driving test to

  https://www.gov.uk/book-driving-test

www,thedrivingskool.com

Plans for instructors to take ‘competent’ trainees on UK’s fastest roads in dual-controlled cars backed by road safety groups

HA0523 - Motorbike on the network. This set of images illustrates bikers driving on motorways and A roads in a safe manner.

Learner drivers will be allowed to practise on motorways for the first time under government plans to improve road safety.

Under current rules, drivers are permitted on motorways only after they have passed their test, though there is no mandatory training for the 70mph roads.

The transport minister, Andrew Jones, announced the plans on Friday, which would allow approved instructors to take “competent” trainees on motorways in dual-controlled cars.

The RAC director, Steve Gooding, and Neil Greig, policy director at the IAM RoadSmart charity, backed the proposal.

Gooding said: “The casualty statistics tell us that motorways are our safest roads, but they can feel anything but safe to a newly qualified driver heading down the slip road for the first time to join a fast-moving, often heavy, flow of traffic.

“Many are so intimidated by the motorway environment that they choose instead to use statistically more dangerous roads, so we welcome this move, which will help new drivers get the training they need to use motorways safely.”

Greig said it was a “sensible and measured solution”, adding: “It makes no sense that new drivers learn by trial and, often fatal, error how to use our fastest and most important roads.”

Under the proposals, motorcyclists would take a theory test as part of the compulsory basic training (CBT) course, which allows bikes and mopeds to be ridden unaccompanied. CBT certificates would be revoked if the motorist gets six penalty points.

Jones said: “These changes will equip learners with a wider range of experience and greater skillset which will improve safety levels on our roads.”

Reports had said the government was considering making learner drivers complete 120 hours of training before taking their tests, but the Department for Transport said there were no current plans for such a measure.

A spokeswoman said: “We have commissioned a £2m research programme that will look at ways we can reduce the number of accidents involving new and inexperienced drivers, and this will look at a range of measures.”

www.thedrivingskool.com


Drivers are risking fines, disqualification or jail because they do not know the rules on supervising learners

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 The motoring group’s survey of 19,000 members suggested nearly a quarter did not know it was illegal to use a mobile phone while out with a learner driver.

Nearly one in 10 respondents was unaware falling asleep was not allowed.

The law states that somebody supervising a learner driver is effectively in control of the car.

In one case a supervisor was jailed after the learner was involved in a crash that killed two people.

It said many learners benefited from time spent with more experienced drivers, but suggested short driving courses for supervisors might be needed.

The AA/Populus survey suggested drivers were also breaking the law by drinking, sending text messages, or failing to wear their glasses while on practice runs with learners.

Some 23% of respondents did not know they would be breaking the law by using a mobile phone while supervising a learner.

And 13% were unaware of the need to wear glasses if they used them when driving themselves, while 9% did not realise that falling asleep in the passenger seat was illegal.

A total of 4% of respondents who had supervised learners admitted breaking at least one of these laws. The figure rose to 22% among supervisors aged 21 to 24.

The president of the AA, Edmund King, said the issue was highlighted by a case in which a person who was supposed to be supervising was over the drink-drive limit.

“This is where the legal point is quite serious because you are actually deemed to be in control of the car, even when you’re supervising. And in fact there has been a case where tragically the learner driver actually had a crash, two people died and the supervisor was actually deemed responsible and actually went to jail.”

Reducing risk

Learners who build on skills they gain in formal lessons by practising with family or friends have a better chance of passing their test and are likely to be safer behind the wheel.

“Yet drivers often lack confidence or don’t know their responsibilities when supervising learners.

“Many are passing on bad driving habits or even risking a run-in with the law.”

Road safety charity Brake said it wanted to see the minimum age for accompanying drivers raised to at least 25.

Katie Shephard from the charity said: “It is vital that learner drivers gain suitable supervised experience behind the wheel, to ensure their safety and the safety of other road users. Accompanying drivers should also be registered as ‘approved accompanying drivers’ by completing a questionnaire to prove their suitability, which could be checked by their insurer.”

Duncan Vernon, road safety manager for the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents, said there was “no doubt” those who supervised learner drivers would benefit from being given more information about how best to teach.

“All-round good practice should involve better co-ordination with approved driving instructors, as well-planned private practice can be invaluable,” he said.

“It gives the novice more experience in all kinds of conditions, thereby reducing the risk of them being involved in a crash once they have passed their test.”

www.thedrivingskool.com

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One in two learner drivers (54%) have been out on the road with their parents despite many mums and dads showing a lack of knowledge of basic driving best practice, with one in five admitting that they are not sure whether they would pass a driving test if they had to take it again.

 The research, commissioned by Admiral-sponsored Young Driver campaign, followed driving instructors working for the scheme where they claimed that their most dreaded phrase from the young drivers was “but my dad says…”

When questioned, 76% of parents believed that they were up-to-date with the latest rules and could provide their children with adequate instruction. However, when quizzed on particular facts it showed that many were off target when shooting for the right answer.

Young Driver offers driving tuition to 10-17 year olds across Britain, and surveyed more than 1,000 people to get these results.

Here are a few of the ‘outdated advice’ as mentioned by Admiral:

Mirror, signal, manoeuvre – more than a third of parents have forgotten this basic rule, despite it being the cornerstone of good driving. While one in two forget to teach their children about the importance of checking dangerous blind spots.

Steering – Four out of five parents (82%) wouldn’t teach the push-pull technique favoured by instructors.

Gear changes – 38% would insist the learner moved up and down the gears sequentially (1-2-3-4-5-6). However, block gear changing is now considered acceptable in many situations.

Hand position – despite many of us being taught that hands should be kept on the steering wheel at the 10 to two position, that advice has been revised over recent years. It is now recommended that hands are in the quarter to three position, to maintain control and to prevent a serious injury should an airbag deploy. Some 46% of parents admitted to insisting their youngsters use the original ten and two placement they’d been taught in the pre-airbag era.

Manoeuvres – One in five would be adamant that a turn in the road was a fail unless it was completed in three manoeuvres. In fact, the modern test allows for up to five turns, hence, it no longer being called a ‘three point turn”.

Assisted technology – One in four would insist young drivers didn’t use parking sensors or cruise control to help with their driving, but these are perfectly acceptable in a test situation when used appropriately.

The research also discovered that dads are twice as likely as mums to take their child out for practice, with the majority offering additional experience lessons alongside ones with their driving instructor.

Kim Stanton, of Young Driver, said: “Our instructors have long despaired of the phrase ‘my dad says’ just because it normally means a parent is contradicting what the professionals are trying to teach the learner!

“Because we teach under 17′s, usually the youngsters haven’t yet had any experience of being taught by a parent, but children are like sponges – they constantly want to absorb information, and once they’ve had a lesson with Young Driver, they often question their parents on driving techniques.

“But of course, the instructors are the experts, and know what the current best practice is, so we’d hope parents would swot up a bit before giving any dud advice! It might actually help their own driving skills too.”

www.thedrivingskool.com

Department for Transport proposals would allow driving instructors to supervise novice drivers on motorways

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Learner drivers could be allowed on motorways for the first time, under government proposals aimed at increasing road safety.

The Department for Transport is considering the move as a way to make sure learners are properly prepared for everyday driving before they pass their tests. Under the plans, they would be allowed to gain experience on motorways under the supervision of an approved driving instructor.

At the moment, learner drivers are not allowed to go on motorways but can do so without having had any practical experience after passing their test.

The possibility of learners on motorways will be explored under a £2m project examining driver education. It will look at whether the current regime gives the best training for learner and novice drivers. Compulsory basic training for learner motorcyclists will also be reviewed.

As part of a package of reforms known as the road safety plan, transport ministers are also planning a £50m grant for better cycling training in schools, and looking at forcing lorries to keep their sideguards to better protect cyclists.

There will also be increased punishments for drivers who use hand-held mobile devices while driving, with an increase from three penalty points to four and the fine rising from £100 to £150. In 2014, mobile phone usage was a contributing factor in 21 fatal road accidents and 84 serious accidents. The penalty for using a mobile while driving larger vehicles such as HGVs will go up from three to six points.

Patrick McLoughlin, the transport secretary, said he was putting forward “common sense proposals that balance tougher penalties for dangerous drivers with practical steps to help youngsters and other more vulnerable groups stay safe on our roads”.

The move to let learner drivers have supervised practice on motorways was welcomed by Steve Gooding, director of the RAC Foundation. “One in five young drivers has an accident within six months of passing their test so putting the learning process under the spotlight has to be a good thing,” he said.

“Mile for mile, motorways are our safest roads but can be intimidating places for novice drivers. Exploring ways of letting learners have controlled access to them is welcome. The important thing is the official seal of approval provided by the approved driving instructor who will accompany them down the slip road. This is definitely not the time to have mum or dad in the passenger seat.”

The government is currently considering a number of reforms to driving tests in order to improve the UK’s road safety record. It is already thinking about giving those who pass their driving test first time a refund of part of the cost. The plan is intended to raise the low first-time pass rate, which stands at just 21%.

At one point, the government was also considering banning newly qualified drivers from carrying non-family members under proposals to cut the number of road accidents involving teenagers.

www.thedrivingskool.com

Benefits of Buying a Car Camera

With more and more UK motorists begining to reap the benifits of installing an in-car camera, sales of these small, purpose built video devices, are increasing daily. Fitting your car camera is easy, they simply attach to your vehicles windscreen via a suction cup or adhesive mount, this enables you to record video footage of the road ahead and gives you your very own ‘eyewitness’. If you’re unfortunate enough to be involved in any kind of collision, they offer complete peace of mind that you’ll have detailed footage of the whole incident. This could help prove your innocence and offers irrefutable video evidence when it comes to settling an insurance claim. The follwing list offers a few more reasons why installing a car camera could be the best thing you ever do…

Protection against Crash for Cash and Insurance fraud

Crash for cash, is without doubt, one of the largest vehicle based crimes an innocent motorist may have to deal with, and the bad news is it’s still on the increase. According to the Insurance Fraud Bureau, organised Crash for Cash scams are costing the UK insurance companies around £392 million every single year, and with 1 in 7 personal injury claims being linked to one, it is netting huge amounts of money for the criminals involved in it. Crash for Cash is a huge problem right now and vehicle insurance fraud is not a victimless crime; it is the honest policy holder that will ultimately pick up the bill with an extra £40-£50 being added to their insurance premiums every single year. Gangs of highly organised criminals will usually stage or induce an ‘accident’ by causing an innocent motorist to crash into the rear of the fraudster’s car. The simplest scenario is where the gang members car may pull directly in front of yours and then by suddenly hitting the brakes they leave  you little or no chance to avoid a rear-end collision. This now gives the criminals the ideal opportunity to make as much money as possible by submitting exaggerated insurance claims for vehicle damage, ‘loss of earnings’ and personal injury, the drivers not only claim this for themselves but sometimes for passengers who weren’t even travelling in the car! By simply installing a car camera in every vehicle that you drive, you’ll be safe in the knowledge that you will be protecting yourself with HD video evidence that will fully show the circumstances leading up to, and including the collision itself. This will give the insurance company any proof it needs if they suspect the claim to be a fraudulent one.

Protect your insurance premiums

Often, when making a claim to your insurance company the claimant will always have to pay an increased cost on their next renewal. This is because most of the time, after an accident each party denies responsibility for it; the result is the insurance companies have to assume equal responsibility for both parties. On some occasions the outcome is even worse and the innocent party is wholly blamed for the collision. Installing a car camera will help ensure that the actions and driving behaviour of those who caused the incident are 100% indisputable. The insurers will be able to get a complete understanding of the circumstances leading up to an accident and this will mean that only the guilty parties’ insurance company will have to pay damages. Thus, in-car video evidence goes a long way to protecting your premiums and your no-claims bonus.

Cheaper car insurance

As car cameras or dash cams become increasingly popular on UK roads, some insurance companies are recognising the benefits of having them fitted and discounts are already being offered for drivers who install and use their cameras regularly. Having high-quality video evidence also means that insurers can spend less time and money investigating suspicious or fraudulent claims and therefore can pass this saving on to the motorist. In a nutshell the car camera will actually pay for itself before there has even been an accident! Still can’t decide whether or not to purchase an in-car camera? For most of us, just the fact it could save us a small fortune on our insurance premiums is enough to make it a “no-brainer”.

Deter, record or report dangerous and unsociable drivers

With the car camera market expanding by the day, drivers will eventually start to become more aware that there are quite a number of vehicles on UK roads that already have an on board video camera mounted inside them. This, we are sure, will eventually start to make every motorist drive with a lot more courtesy and patience for others. Unfortunately, at this moment in time, we are still a long way away from this. With speeding motorists wanting to under-take or push in front of us, angry tailgaters who insist on driving a few inches away from our rear bumper or selfish drivers who chat away on their mobile phones, these are all examples of incidents that are happening on a daily basis and are making our roads as dangerous as ever. So how can we combat this? Simple, by using an in-car camera system you’ll have the ability to capture any dangerous or reckless driving on video. This can then be reported to the local authorities and in many cases these drivers will be prosecuted solely on car camera evidence.

Protect against road rage incidents

Road rage attacks are becoming ever more common in the UK. In most cases this involves nothing more than some choice words or possibly some offensive hand gestures.  That said, there are a number of drivers who are reportedly finding themselves as a target of actual physical violence. If you have a car camera fitted, try to make sure you always position yourself in front of it whilst you’re exchanging details; this ensures that any offensive behaviour or threats will be caught on camera. Another way to diffuse a potentially violent situation is to inform the other driver that the event is being monitored and recorded, this can be a useful tool, helping to diffuse a volatile situation. Many attackers will be far more likely to back down once they know their actions being filmed by your ‘eyewitness’.

Protection in car parks 

G-shock technology sensors are tiny motion sensors that are built in to most modern day car cameras. This enables the camera to instantly start recording the moment it detects either, movement around the car, or a sudden bump or jolt to the vehicle itself. This will be an enormous benefit to you if you happen to return to your parked car to find it scratched or damaged in some way. The saved file from your in-car camera can be viewed once you’re back at home, or with some car cameras, the footage can be watched there and then on your smartphone using a Wi-Fi connection. It gives you extra peace of mind that you may have caught the culprits face on camera or in the case of the damage being caused by another vehicle; you’ll not only have video images of the incident taking place but also the vehicles registration plate. This gives you the advantage of bringing any guilty party to justice and once again saves you from having to make a claim on your own insurance.

Record commercial and fleet driver’s activity

With the advances in car camera technology it is now possible to start protecting your entire workforce whilst they’re out on the road. Fleet owners now also have the ability to monitor every one of their vehicles and driver’s activity. Using Google maps they can check whether a driver has adhered to the correct pre-planned route, not broken the speed limit and more importantly not been driving without due care and attention. At the same time many drivers now enjoy the peace of mind that having a camera installed brings. Commercial drivers are often the target of crash for cash scams, this is because the gangs know that a commercial vehicle will undoubtedly have insurance, when a larger van or lorry is blamed for being at fault in an accident, irrefutable video evidence can immediately prove the drivers innocence, therefore not only protecting the fleet owner’s insurance costs but also helping to protect the employees driving licence and ultimately, their job.

Taxi and Private hire protection

If you drive a black cab for a living or you’re always on the road as a private hire driver the chances are, at some point, you’ve ended up either having a near miss with another vehicle or maybe found yourself in a vulnerable situation with one of your passengers. With Taxi and private hire insurance premiums being at an all-time high, there’s never been a better time to install your very own ‘eyewitness’ protection. These days you’ll find CCTV everywhere you go so why should your cab or minibus be any different? There are numerous problems that can arise whilst driving, these include damage to the outside of your cab from other road users, verbal and sometimes physical abuse and of course those customers who have decided not to pay their fair at all! Having the knowledge that you have a reliable camera system in place will go a long way to improving safety for both the driver and passengers alike.

Young and novice driver protection

The cost of insurance premiums for young or novice drivers has increased dramatically over the past few years; some of these premiums can range anywhere from £3,000 to £7,000 a year! This is largely because younger and less experienced drivers are more likely to be involved in an incident or accident in their first few years on the road. To combat some of these issues insurance companies will only offer them a policy if they then agree to have a ‘black box’ fitted in their car. This then tells the insurer their locality, what time of day or night it was and more importantly what speed they were travelling. Now imagine installing a car camera into their vehicle to back this up, it would not only give their insurance company a visual image of how they were driving, but could potentially prove their innocence should they ever be involved in a collision with another motorist. Worth thinking about, isn’t it?

Protect your vehicle against misuse and abuse

When you have to leave your vehicle with a stranger, it can sometimes be a real worry. Without an in-car camera installed you have no idea how others are treating your property. How many times have you left your vehicle at a garage for repair, service or M.O.T or maybe had to leave it with a valet parking company at an airport? Once it’s out of your sight, what really goes on? Having a car camera installed enables you to see (and sometimes hear) exactly what happens once you’ve dropped it off and handed over your keys. Viewing the camera footage back will enable you to know exactly where your vehicle was and how it was treated. If you have a car camera with built-in GPS you’ll also be able to see the route it was driven, how fast it was travelling and where abouts it was left parked up.

www.thedrivingskool.com

Office: 0333 123 0245

Mobile: 079 19193299

These tips should help make passing your driving test easier.

1. Practice. A lot

The Driving and Vehicle Standards Agency suggests that learners, on average, need about 45 hours of professional training plus 22 hours of private practice. Make sure you learn with an instructor you feel comfortable with, from a reputable driving school – and practise with an experienced friend or relative to hone your skills.

2. Warm up

Book a lesson near the test centre just before your test appointment time, so you don’t drive ‘cold’ when you have to get into the car with the examiner. It can also helps to scope out any obstructions such as potholes, local congestion or new roadworks, so you’re prepared if you encounter them during the test.

3. Relax

It’s perfectly normal to be nervous about taking your driving test, so take the pressure off yourself by not telling many people beforehand.

On the day, take deep breaths, count to 10 and exhale just before entering the test centre. Do this a few times and you should find yourself calming down and ready to drive.

4. Think positively

Before you enter the test centre, believe that you’re going to pass. Try some creative visualisation, which involves closing your eyes and imagining yourself driving well over the route, making flawless manoeuvres and seeing all the potential hazards.

5. Be comfortable in your car

Make sure you sit your test in a car you’ve driven regularly – either your instructor’s or the car you use for practising.

You need to feel completely comfortable with controls and, even more importantly, the biting point of the clutch, which will allow you to move off and change gears smoothly.

6. Know the route

Do your homework and make sure you know the area around the test centre and all the possible routes you’ll be driving. Drive them as often as possible with your instructor and, if possible, when practising privately.

It’s also important to be comfortable driving different on as many different types of road as possible, so you’re ready for the independent driving section of the test and, more importantly, life after passing your test.

7. Avoid the usual mistakes

Common driving test pitfalls include not checking mirrors sufficiently, inadequate observation when reverse parking or moving away, poor positioning at junctions and roundabouts, and inappropriate speed.

Discover these bad habits when you learn to drive to help you avoid them.

8. Be ready for anything

When learning, try to drive at different times of day, in sunny weather and the wet – and, if possible, in slippery or icy conditions so you’re prepared for any eventuality during your test.

9. Don’t be afraid to ask

If, at any time during the test, you don’t understand what the examiner has asked you to do, don’t be afraid to ask him or her to repeat the instruction.

10. Keep your eyes on the road

Whatever you do, don’t look at the examiner during the test or try to look at their notes and work out how well you’re doing.

Keep your eyes on the road, making full use of your mirrors and concentrate on what’s going on around you.

www.thedrivingskool.com

Office 0333 123 0245

Mobile 07919 193299

How many driving lessons on average do you need to take before you can pass? What’s the average number of lessons people take before they take their driving test?

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Chances are, these are questions you’ve been asking yourself and others.

We’re here to tell you the answer is ‘does not matter’.

That’s right. It does not matter what the average number of lessons is, because you are not an average person. You are unique with unique skills and unique needs.

You probably have noticed when asking around for the number of average lessons you’ll get all sorts of ridiculous numbers. We’ve even heard people claiming they only needed 10 lessons to pass their driving test!

Let’s pretend for a second that they’re telling the truth (they’re not). They passed after 10 lessons (they didn’t). So what?

What has somebody else’s ability (or imagination) got to do with you?

Even still, we have a problem with the question. In fact, any decent driving instructor should whince if you ask them how many lessons you need before you can pass your test.

The reason is simple. Do you want to simply pass your test, or do you want to be a safe and confident driver?

Every year hundreds of new drivers die on the road. Imagine how much smaller the figure would be if all of those drivers had the desire to become safe drivers, rather than to just scrape a pass for their driving test with the minimum amount of lessons?

Think about it for a second. Do you want to sacrifice your life (and other people’s) for the sake of shaving off a few hours and saving £100?

There is a myth out there that driving instructors want to stretch out the number of lessons as much as possible. That if they could they’d make you have to take 100 lessons before you could take your test.

This is just untrue.

Every driving instructor has a responsibility to you. They would rather be accused of stretching out lessons than be the one who rushed through 20 lessons for a young person to pass their test only to die in a car crash months later.

That is why we’re not going to tell you what the average number of lessons it takes to pass. We don’t want to add to the idea that the point of driving lessons is to learn the bare minimum in the minimal amount of time to squeeze through a pass.

It will take you as long as it will and as many lessons as it will to be a safe and confident driver.

Remember, your safety is worth far more than any amount of money you think you’ll be saving by rushing things.

www.thedrivingskool.com

Office 0333 123 0245

Mobile 07919 193299