Office 0333 123 0245,
Text/Call 07599 408188

Bromley Driving Test Centre

Burnt Ash Lane

121-123 Burnt Ash Lane
BROMLEY
Kent
BR1 5AB

DVSA Test Centre

121-123 Burnt Ash Lane, Bromley, BR1 5AB

Parking: Due to the car park being in a residential area with limited parking Enter the car park via Brindley way and NOT through the alley way between the shops
Toilets: Male and female toilets available

To book your driving test: https://www.gov.uk/book-driving-test

Rear Parking Bays

Rear Parking Bays

 

www.thedrivingskool.com

Office 0333 123 0245

Mobile 07919 193299

 

 

 

 

 

picmonkey_image

New drivers could be banned from travelling at night as part of plans to improve road safety.

Plans for a graduated licence system to restrict novice drivers in England, Scotland and Wales were announced by the Department for Transport (DfT).

The move comes as figures suggest one in five drivers are involved in a crash within a year of passing their test.

But the AA warned “excessive” safety measures could become an “unnecessary burden” for motorists.

As well as not driving at night, the DfT said the system could feature restrictions such as a minimum learning period and not driving with passengers under a certain age.

The DfT did not say how long the measures would be in place after someone had passed their driving test.

Road safety minister Michael Ellis said getting a driving licence could be both “exciting” and “daunting” for young people.

He said graduated driver licensing could “help new drivers to stay safe and reduce the number of people killed or injured on our roads”.

The DfT is considering how the system could work, as part of its Road Safety Action Plan, which will be published on Friday.

A spokeswoman said research as to how the scheme would work in practice and further details will be available until 2020.

A Scottish Government spokesperson said ministers supported introducing a graduated licensing scheme, but representations to consider

devolving power to Holyrood to enable this have been rejected.

Plans in Northern Ireland to launch a graduate licensing pilot scheme have been put on hold due to the absence of government.

Graduated licensing schemes already operate in several parts of the world, including New York and California in the US, Ontario and British Columbia in Canada, New South Wales and Victoria in Australia, and across Sweden.

They have previously been rejected in Britain over concerns they would restrict young people from accessing education and employment

Under current rules, new drivers risk having their licences revoked if they accumulate six penalty points within the first two years of passing the test.

But there are no restrictions on when people can drive or the age of their passengers.

oshua Harris, director of campaigns for road safety charity Brake, said those particularly at risk were “overconfident” newly-qualified young male drivers.

Mr Harris said a more “robust” licensing process could help to keep these drivers safe.

While the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) also welcomed the trial, the AA warned any such scheme should be “properly researched and piloted” to avoid creating an “unnecessary burden”.

www.thedrivingskool.com

Source: BBC News 2019

 

Top 10 reasons for failing the UK practical driving test 2019

If your looking to pass your driving test, have a look through some of the common reasons why people fail their driving test.

The Driving Examiner is not looking for perfection on your driving test. Your overall objective is to drive in a safe, observant manner, respecting speed limits without effecting traffic or other road users. You can get up to 15 minor faults but 1 serious or dangerous fault & you will have to repeat the driving test.

1. Observation at junctions: “look right, left & ahead”

Poor observations at junctions are one of the top 10 reasons for failing your driving test.

Use the MSPSL routine, peep & creep if necessary at closed junctions until you have a clear vision of potential hazards.

2. Failing to check mirrors: “Mirror or Mirrors”

Your main focus should obviously be ahead, but you should be checking your mirrors on a regular basis during your driving test as they give you valuable information & help your decision making. Mirrors must be checked in good time when changing speed or direction.

3. Control of steering wheel “pull & push”

The Driving examiner is looking for safe smooth steering keeping good control. Improper steering or excessive steering, causing you to go close to a kerb or cars will cause a fault.

4. Turning right at junctions “slow down on the approach & plan ahead”

Turning right at junctions or crossroads is one the most common reasons for failing your driving test. You need to ensure correct road position, good clutch control, & great observation.

Remember your point of turn, not cutting corners or swing too far left.

5. Failing to move off safely from stationary position “Lifesaver check”

The examiner will ask you to park up & move off safely during the driving test & it is essential you check over your right shoulder just before you move off.

6. Positioning of car on road “Stay in your lane”

Lane discipline & drifting slightly into another lane, towards parked cars or the kerb will cause a driving fault. Keep an eye on road markings, be particularly careful on roundabouts & bends.

7. Inappropriate speed: “20 is Plenty”

It does not necessarily follow that only small roads are 20mph.

If you are taking driving lessons near Didsbury test center, you will have noticed lots of 20mph speed limits & speed limit changes. Be particularly careful during school times. You can fail your test for going too fast or to slow!

8. Response to traffic lights: “Green Means Go”

If your in the habit of following the car in front & not anticipating that the green lights may change as you approach, you’re very likely to come unstuck on your driving test.

Whenever you see traffic lights ahead anticipate them changing as your approaching. Don’t suddenly brake when you are near the stop line as it may not always be safe for you to do this. Make sure you stop at the first line & not go over Advanced Stop Lines or “Bike box”. Look for the green filter light as waiting unnecessarily will incur a fault.

9. Reverse park Exercise “ Slow & steady”

The reverse parking exercise on the driving test such as parallel parking, fills many with dread.

You should not really fail on the manoeuvres as you can always fix it. For example if not correctly parked in a bay, open the door if necessary & check. The most common way to fail is due to lack of observation whilst parking, so take your time slow clutch control & pause if necessary for other passing traffic.

10. Response to traffic signs “be alert & anticipate”

Be aware & alert to roadworks, temporary lane changes or diversions. Plan your lane change early. Roadworks with temporary traffic lights, stop at the correct place.

 

When learning to drive you’re likely to learn all your driving skills with an instructor, and then perfect these if you take up private practice outside of your lessons. This is a great way to work on your driving skills, as well as building confidence to get you through your test. But what about after you’ve passed your test? Many young drivers want to jump in their car as a full licence holder and take to the road – but the places they want to go, they haven’t practised!

So we thought we’d pull together 8 places you can go as a learner driver during private practice, which should help give you confidence after you’ve passed!

1. Drive Thru

As any self-respecting new driver does, one of the first things I did when I got my car was head to my local McDonald’s Drive-Thru! Exciting about being behind the wheel (and obviously for the nuggets that were coming my way), I didn’t realise how tricky they are to actually navigate your way through! Tight corners, slow-moving cars, getting close enough to the window to actually pay and pick up your food – it’s a difficult thing to master. Making these trips as a learner during private practice means you’ll be a pro by the time you get your full licence.

2. Multi-storey

Whether you like them or loathe them – you’ll more than likely end up using a multi-storey car park at some point as a new driver. You’re probably used to hill starts and driving down slopes, but it’s a completely different ball game when you’re in a confined space surrounded by other cars! Even if you don’t need to go shopping, it’s worth heading to a multi-storey car park to practice your driving and parking. A little tip: when driving in a multi-storey, stick in first gear and avoid using the clutch. This will give you complete control over your speed when driving up and down the ramps.

3. Fill up with fuel

One of the things we rarely think about (let alone practice) is filling up a car with fuel – and if you’ve never done it before, it can be pretty tricky. Knowing which side your petrol cap is, parking the correct distance from the pump, and using those complicated ‘Pay at the Pump’ options can be a minefield if you’re not used to it! It’s worth heading out when it’s quiet and practising filling up fuel with your accompanying driver. That way, when it comes to filling up on your own, you’ll be fine!

It’s worth remembering that each car is different, so figure out how to open the fuel cap of the car you’re driving before heading off. Top tip: the image of the fuel pump on the dashboard often has an arrow next to it – this shows you what side of the car you fill up from!

4. Nighttime

Out of 500 learner drivers that we surveyed, 58%* of them said they wished nighttime driving to be incorporated into driving lessons – and it makes sense. Driving at night is much more challenging than you may first realise. There’s limited visibility overall, and pairing this with bright street lights and other car lights which can be quite dazzling, especially if you haven’t done it before.

5. Seaside

If you pass during the summer, one of the first trips you may want to take is heading to the seaside with your friends – right? Seaside drives can actually be pretty difficult! If it’s a nice day, you can almost guarantee everyone else plans on hitting the beach too, which means a lot of traffic! If you’re dealing with this as a new driver, as well as heading to a likely overcrowded car park – it’s going to be pretty stressful!

Think about heading to the seaside on a practice run before passing your test. You can figure out the route, and maybe even find a hidden gem car park that won’t be as busy when the sun comes out!

6. City Centre

You may have practised driving around your local city centre on your driving lessons, but going further afield and driving to different town or city can be daunting, especially if it’s new territory. You’ll have to deal with different road layouts, roundabouts and probably the same parking situation as if you were going to the beach. Maybe take some time during your private practice to visit a nearby town or city you’re unfamiliar with – this will help build your confidence for when you tackle it alone.

7. Event

Whether you’re a sports fan or music lover, you may be super-eager to head to a concert or festival with your new found freedom! The biggest challenges when driving to and from an event are getting in, parking and getting out. It may sound simple, but when thousands of people want to do it at the same time, it can definitely raise your stress levels – especially if you’re driving back from a gig late at night and you’re tired! If you’ve got an event coming up as a learner, consider offering to drive to or from the venue. You’ll get a taste for what it’s like, without being thrown completely in the deep end.

8. Village driving

Narrow and winding roads, paired with other cars and pedestrians can make driving through a small village pretty challenging. You will often find yourself faced with blind corners and tight bends which can make any new driver nervous. So to build up your confidence put on your L plates and get practising – dealing with as many different driving scenarios as a learner, when you have an experienced driver with you, will help to build up your skill and confidence for when you hit the roads on your own!

And there you have it – 8 different places we think you should try to drive to whilst you’ve still got the L plates on. Make the most of your time as a learner, and try to gain as much experience as you can! If you can think of any other drives learners should take, let us know!

Marmalade Driving Hub: www.wearemarmalade.co.uk/driver-hub

The Bromley Driving Test Centre will close on Friday 21 December 2018. (Bromley Court Hotel)

All driving tests from Thursday 3 January 2019 will be carried out at Club Langley, Bromley.

Driving test centre address

Club Langley driving test centre
2 Hawsbrook Lane
Beckenham
Kent
BR3 3SR

tesr

the driving skool.com Call 0333 123 0245

 

Dashcams_P1210466

www.thedrivingskool.com Call 0333 123 0245

Fears about “crash for cash” fraudsters have helped to prompt a surge in the proportion of motorists owning a dashcam, a survey of AA members suggests.

A fifth (20%) of drivers own a dashcam – and 51% expressed an interest in having one, a poll of over 21,000 members, found. Five years ago, just 1% of members had a dashcam, the AA said.

The main reason for having a dashcam, given by 60% of those who own one, was to help establish liability in the event of a crash. A quarter (25%) of dashcam owners said their greatest concern is to protect themselves against cash for crash fraudsters, who stage accidents in order to make insurance claims.

Young drivers aged 17 to 24 are most likely to have a dashcam, with over-65s being the next most likely age group, the research found.

Men were more likely than women to say they have a dashcam.

One in 20 (5%) of dashcam owners got one to reduce their insurance premiums, 3% wanted to record possible thefts or collisions while parked, 2% bought one to record bad behaviour by other drivers which they could highlight online, and 1% have a dashcam “because I like gadgets”.

The AA said that as well as helping insurers, dashcams can also be a useful tool for the police. Janet Connor, the AA’s director of insurance said: “Data is king in the event of a collision and dashcam footage provides proper, reliable evidence that can establish fault.”

She said: “While we are all familiar with dashcam footage loaded on to social media, only 2% of AA members said that this was their motivation. Overwhelmingly, drivers say their key reason for using one is to provide evidence in the event of a collision, thus protecting their insurance.

Several insurance fraudsters have been brought to book thanks to camera evidence.

 

 

 

 

New drivers could face restrictions on the number of passengers they can carry, plus a mandatory six-month training period

New drivers could soon face new laws after the Department for Transport said it is to investigate introducing graduated driving licences

The proposals would limit the number of passengers new, young drivers could carry, set a minimum learning period of six months before a driving test could be taken and mandate the displaying of ‘P’ plates for the first two years after the passing of driving tests.

The news comes as a letter written by roads safety minister, Jesse Norman, says a proposed graduated driving licence system in Northern Ireland will be used as a “pilot” scheme to gauge whether graduated driving licences should be introduced across the UK.

In the letter, sent to Scottish SMP David Stewart, Norman writes: “The Department for Transport has decided to use the introduction of  graduated driving licences in Northern Ireland as a pilot to gather evidence on the potential for graduated driving licences in GB”.

Northern Irish authorities are currently in the second stage of a public consultation, which proposes limiting the number of passengers new drivers aged 24 and under can carry for the first six months after passing their driving tests.

Under the plans, young drivers would only be allowed to carry one passenger aged between 14 to 20, between the hours of 11pm and 6am, for the first six months after passing their test – though immediate family members would be exempt from this rule.

The graduated driving licence would also mandate a minimum learning period of six months before a driving test can be taken, while new drivers would also have to display ‘R’ plates (short for ‘restricted’) for two years after passing the test – though any UK graduated driving licence scheme outside of Northern Ireland would most likely use the more familiar ‘P’ plates.

Novice drivers in Northern Ireland already face post-test restrictions, which mandate the carrying of ‘R’ plates for the first year of driving, and set a maximum speed limit of 45mph – though the proposed graduated driving licence system would see an end to that limit.

 

the driving skool.com Chislehurst Kent

www.thedrivingskool.com Call 0333 123 0245

 

 

Learner drivers can take motorway driving lessons with an approved driving instructor from 4 June 2018.

From Monday 4 June 2018, learner drivers will be able to take driving lessons on motorways in England, Scotland and Wales.

This will help to make sure more drivers know how to use motorways safely.

At the moment, you can only have motorway lessons after you’ve passed your driving test. Some newly-qualified drivers take lessons through the voluntary Pass Plus scheme.

How the change will work

Learner drivers will need to be:

Accompanied by an approved driving instructor

Driving a car fitted with dual controls

Any motorways lessons will be voluntary.  It will be up to the driving instructor to decide when the learner driver is competent enough for them

The change only applies to learner drivers of cars. Learner motorcyclists won’t be allowed on motorways.

Trainee driving instructors won’t be allowed to take learner drivers on the motorway.

Motorway driving isn’t being introduced to the driving test as part of this change.

Until the law changes, it’s still illegal for a learner driver to drive on a motorway.

www.thedrivingskool.com Office: 0333 123 0245 Mobile: 07919 193299

The driving test will change from Monday 4 December 2017 to include following directions from a sat nav and testing different manoeuvres.

The changes are designed to make sure new drivers have the skills they’ll need to help them through a lifetime of safe driving.

The changes will only apply to car driving tests to begin with.

The 4 driving test changes

1. Independent driving part of the test will increase to 20 minutes

The independent driving part of the test currently lasts around 10 minutes. During this part of the test, you have to drive without turn-by-turn directions from the driving examiner.

This part of the test will be made longer, so it’ll last around 20 minutes – roughly half of the test.

2. Following directions from a sat nav

During the independent driving part of the test, most candidates will be asked to follow directions from a sat nav.

The examiner will provide the sat nav (a TomTom Start 52) and set it up. You won’t need to set the route – the examiner will do this for you. So, it doesn’t matter what make or model of sat nav you practise with.

You can’t follow directions from your own sat nav during the test – you have to use the one supplied by the examiner.

You’ll be able to ask the examiner for confirmation of where you’re going if you’re not sure. It won’t matter if you go the wrong way unless you make a fault while doing it.

One in 5 driving tests won’t use a sat nav. You’ll need to follow traffic signs instead.

3. Reversing manoeuvres will be changed

The ‘reverse around a corner’ and ‘turn-in-the-road’ manoeuvres will no longer be tested, but you should still be taught them by your instructor.

You’ll be asked to do one of 3 possible reversing manoeuvres:

Parallel park at the side of the road

Park in a bay – either driving in and reversing out, or reversing in and driving out (the examiner will tell you which you have to do)

Pull up on the right-hand side of the road, reverse for 2 car lengths and rejoin the traffic

4. Answering a vehicle safety question while you’re driving

The examiner will ask you 2 vehicle safety questions during your driving test – these are known as the ‘show me, tell me’ questions.

Tell me question (where you explain how you’d carry out a safety task) at the start of your test, before you start driving

Show m’ question (where you show how you’d carry out a safety task) while you’re driving – for example, showing how to wash the windscreen using the car controls and wipers

Pass mark, length of test and cost not changing

The pass mark is staying the same. So, you’ll pass your test if you make no more than 15 driving faults and no serious or dangerous faults.

The examiner will still mark the test in the same way, and the same things will still count as faults.

The overall time of the driving test won’t change. It will still take around 40 minutes. The driving test cost will also stay the same.

Learner drivers will be allowed to take motorway driving lessons with an approved driving instructor in a car with dual controls from 2018.

Allowing learner drivers to have lessons on motorways will help to make sure more drivers know how to use motorways safely.

At the moment, you can only have driving lessons on motorways after you’ve passed your driving test. Some newly-qualified drivers take lessons through the voluntary Pass Plus scheme.

How the change will work

The change will apply to England, Scotland and Wales. Learner drivers will need to be

Accompanied by an approved Driving Instructor

Driving a vehicle fitted with dual controls

Any motorways lessons will be voluntary. It will be up to the driving instructor to decide when the learner driver is competent enough to have a motorway lesson.Trainee driving instructors won’t be allowed to take learner drivers on the motorway.

Motorway driving will not be included in the driving test changes coming into force on 4 December 2017.

The change will only apply to learner drivers of cars – learner motorcyclists won’t be allowed to have motorway lessons.

When the change will happen

The exact date in 2018 will be confirmed nearer the time.

The change will be well-publicised so driving instructors and learner drivers are prepared for the change, and other road users know what to expect. The Highway Code rules on motorways will also be updated.

Driving instructor vehicles and training

Driving instructors will be allowed to decide whether or not to keep their driving school roof-top box on during motorway lessons, based on the manufacturer’s instructions.

However, the car will still need to display L plates on the front and rear if the rooftop box is removed.

www.thedrivingskool.com